Dec., 1941 – U.S. declares war

Cal Alley, K.C. Journal

America declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941. Germany declared war on the U.S. three days later, and the U.S. responded by declaring war on Germany as well.

S.J. Ray, I.C. Star

Cal Alley, K.C. Journal

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 Responses to Dec., 1941 – U.S. declares war

  1. Don Kusmaul says:

    Thanks for sharing this historical collection of cartoons. I am learning much about WWII that I did not know, or, at best, remained very disconnected and incomplete. Your collection and good commentary fills in the gaps.

    I have made it through 1941 and will be visiting your website again soon.

  2. Don Kusmaul says:

    Thanks for sharing this historical collection of cartoons. I am learning much about WWII that I did not know, or, at best, remained very disconnected and incomplete. Your collection and good commentary fills in the gaps.

    I have made it through 1941 and will be visiting your website again soon.

  3. benjamin s says:

    Thanks for the curating work. it is super interesting. A window into the true feelings of the public at those crucial times

  4. Richard Watson says:

    I’m so glad that I stumbled across your website almost by accident as I have a passion for both political cartoons and military history. Many thanks for posting it and well done to your Aunt for keeping such a record for posterity.

    I live in Northern Ireland where political cartoons in the last thirty years helped people to cope with difficult times and eventually helped to restore peace and harmony to our country.

    My late father – George Watson – served in the Royal Navy on small US-built lease-lend aircraft carriers. Really only converted merchant ships and not ideal as warships especially in the wild conditions of winter convoys to Artic Russia but vital to protect Allied convoys from U-boat attacks.

    Dad was in the United States a number of times during the War, including a period of several months while they were commissioning a ship in Norfolk, Virginia. He always had very fond memories of the friendship and hospitality he and his shipmates received from people in America, especially when they worked on local farms near Raleigh in North Carolina to bring in the crops – sugar cane I think.

    One story he told me sums it up pretty well. One snowy winter’s day in 1943, he and a pal were on shore leave in New York when they came across some kids tobogganing on the pavement. They persuaded the kids to let them have a go but hurtled on to to a busy traffic intersection bringing the cars to a sudden halt. Picking themselves up they found a burly Irish-American cop standing over them who sternly asked who they were and what they thought they were doing.

    On hearing they were British sailors, the cop gruffly told them that they had to accompany him to the Police Precinct. By now a bit alarmed the two young sailors (only 20 years old) were worried how they could explain being arrested to their ship’s Captain.

    At the Precinct, the cop took them up to the desk sergeant and explained what had happened, finishing by saying he was going to take them into Room 22. The sergeant looked at the culprits severely and said “I’ll come with you in case there’s any trouble.”

    With a flourish the sergeant threw open the door of Room 22 which turned out to be the precinct social club where a number of off-duty cops were enjoying a beer at the bar.

    Several hours later two, by now rather drunk, sailors who had not been allowed to put their hands in their pockets to buy a drink for their hosts were delivered in a squad car back to their ship with the best wishes of the NYPD.

    A story that came back to me forcefully after 9/11 and the self-sacrifice of New York police and fire officers, which I’m sure would have caused Dad a lot of distress.

  5. James Gagnon says:

    Thanks for this website, with out it i would have not passed my history class!

  6. Tom says:

    Facinating material. What forethought you Aunt had to keep political cartoons a year before the US entered the war.

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